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North Bay woman captures 'light pillars' on cellphone

Light pillars appear when artificial light or natural light bounces off the facets of flat ice crystals wafting relatively close to the ground

NORTH BAY — BayToday reader Amanda Syvret was quick to point her cellphone at these wonders of nature called "light pillars."

Amanda noticed the phenomenon around 3:30 Sunday morning.

According the National Geographic News, light pillars are an atmospheric optical phenomenon that "appear when artificial light or natural light bounces off the facets of flat ice crystals wafting relatively close to the ground. When the light source is close to the ground, the light pillar appears above the floating crystals. When the light comes from the sun or moon, the light pillar can appear beneath them, too, as the light refracts through the crystals."

Back in Jan. 2017, North Bay resident Timothy Elzinga got a surprise when he awoke at 1:30 a.m. and shot some similar photos.

See: North Bay man captures pillar lights

According to The Weather Network, light pillars are very rare to see. 




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Jeff Turl

About the Author: Jeff Turl

Jeff is a veteran of the news biz. He's spent a lengthy career in TV, radio, print and online, covering both news and sports. He enjoys free time riding motorcycles and spoiling grandchildren.
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