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Good morning, Nickel City! Here are stories to start your day

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Good morning, Greater Sudbury! Here are a few stories to start your day on this Monday morning.

Hundreds turn out for 43rd annual Terry Fox Run

It was a sunny and warm September day for the hundreds of Sudburians who converged on the Grace Hartman Amphitheatre in Bell Park on Sept. 17 for the 43rd annual Terry Fox Run. Prior to the event, local organizer Melissa Dutrisac said the continued popularity of the event is a testament to the impact Fox had and still has on the lives of Canadians. "It's amazing that this event continues to be so popular, considering that 43 years have passed since Terry was running his Marathon of Hope and many of today's population were not yet born," said Dutrisac. "However, it is not surprising. Terry Fox is a Canadian hero due to his many admirable traits, including his selflessness, courage, and determination." The Sept. 17 event kicked off with a warm up. Then, Frances Summerhill, the honorary chair of the Sudbury Terry Fox Run who has been volunteering for the event for 37 years, brought up for inspirational young fundraisers to introduce to the crowd.

Read the full story and watch the video here.

Person in crisis on Beatty trestle taken to hospital by police

Greater Sudbury Police Service said one of its patrol supervisors managed to talk a person in crisis off the Beatty Street trestle bridge Saturday evening. Police said officers were dispatched to the area at around 6:30 p.m. on Sept. 16 regarding a person in crisis. “Patrol officers responded and located the party atop the train trestle between Beatty Street and Frood Road,” GSPS said in a news release. A supervisor with the services Patrol Operations Division began speaking with the individual and maintained a dialogue for around 90 minutes, managing to convince the person to come off the bridge. “The matter was safely resolved when the subject was led to safety by our supervisor and a member of our  Emergency Response Unit,” GSPS said. The person was taken to Health Sciences North.

Potential ‘strong mayor’ powers listed in municipal report

In a report to Thunder Bay city council, that municipality’s city clerk, Krista Power, highlighted several potential things a mayor can now do under the provincial legislation. Many of the powers are complex, Power wrote in a media release issued this week, noting that many of them require only one-third support of city council. “Some of the legislative changes have not been confirmed by the province, such as what local boards could be impacted,” Power noted. The potential powers include the ability to appoint, dismiss and assign “other duties” to the city manager and to hire or dismiss the “head of any other part of the organizational structure” of the city, among other new powers. The province has clarified that city council has the ability to override mayor vetoes with a two-thirds vote, including the mayor as a voting party. These powers have not been extended to Thunder Bay Mayor Ken Boshcoff, but have been extended to Greater Sudbury Mayor Paul Lefebvre.

Read the full story here.

Gorgeous day for 14th annual Anderson Farm Fall Fair

If you were planning a fall fair, you couldn’t ask for a better day than Sept. 16. Comfortable temperatures and sunny skies saw thousands of Sudburians make the trip out to Lively for the Anderson Farm Musuem’s Fall Fair. The 14th annual fall fair returned this year after having been absent since 2019 due first to COVID-19 and then to capital repairs and an archaeological assessment at the Lively facility. The all-day event featured dozens of vendors, free activities, displays and demonstrations provided by community partners, children’s activities (including inflatables), a classic and special interest car show, first responders and an introduction to precision sports, such as golf and archery. Live entertainment, including the Sudbury and District Pipe Band, Hillbilly Ramblers, SEVEN + One, Pop Mach!ne, Dual Play, D’n A, Outsider and one of the three Lively District Secondary School bands.

Read the full story and watch the video here.

Cubs unbeaten in four after shootout win over Voodoos

The Greater Sudbury Cubs are unbeaten in four games after securing a shootout win in Powassan on Saturday. It took nine minutes for the first goal to be scored and it was Sudbury that drew first blood. On the power play, Marshall McCharles took a sharp cross-crease pass from Nolan Newton and fired it past Powassan Voodoos netminder Daniel Dirracolo. The first would end with the Cubs up 1-0. There would be no more scoring in the hotly contested battle until near the end of the second period. The Voodoos’ Carson Ricci tied it up when he took a Ryan Patrick pass in the slot and ripped it past the blocker of Greater Sudbury’s Noah Metivier. The Cubs would retake the lead before the second intermission, though. Team captain Oliver Smith knocked down an up-ice pass from Newton and darted in alone on a breakaway before neatly picking the bottom-left corner to put Sudbury up 2-1.

Read the full story here.

Sudbury woman named new president of MacLean Engineering

A woman well-known to the Sudbury mining community has been named president of MacLean Engineering, a company that has been building and supplying custom mining vehicles for 50 years. The company, located in Collingwood, Ontario had its roots in Sudbury thanks to the vision of former Inco miner Don MacLean, the company founder. Stella Holloway, formerly the MacLean vice-president of sales and operations for Ontario, Central and Western Canada, and the Maritimes, has been promoted to the office of company  president, said a MacLean news release. Holloway has had an impressive 15-year tenure at MacLean Engineering, where she has held various leading positions in sales and management, said the company. "With her strong leadership skills and customer-centric approach, she consistently achieved positive outcomes in Canada,” the company said in a news release. 

Current Weather

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

21.3°C

Pressure
102.9 rising
Visibility
32.2 km
Dewpoint
14.3 °C
Humidity
64%
Wind
NE 16 km/h

Radar Satellite


Hourly Forecast

Today
1 PM
24°C
A mix of sun and cloud
Today
2 PM
25°C
Mainly sunny
Today
3 PM
25°C
Mainly sunny
Today
4 PM
26°C
Sunny
Today
5 PM
26°C
Mainly sunny
Today
6 PM
24°C
Mainly sunny
Today
7 PM
23°C
Mainly sunny
Today
8 PM
21°C
Sunny
Today
9 PM
20°C
Clear
Today
10 PM
18°C
A few clouds
Today
11 PM
17°C
A few clouds
Tomorrow
12 AM
16°C
A few clouds

7 Day Forecast

Chance of showers

Today

26 °C

A mix of sun and cloud. 60 percent chance of showers near noon. High 26. Humidex 32. UV index 9 or very high.


Chance of showers

Tonight

14 °C

Partly cloudy. 40 percent chance of showers overnight. Low 14.


Chance of showers

Friday

24 °C

Mainly cloudy with 40 percent chance of showers. High 24. Humidex 27. UV index 7 or high.


Cloudy

Friday night

15 °C

Cloudy. Low 15.


Chance of showers

Saturday

22 °C

Cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers. High 22.


Chance of showers

Saturday night

17 °C

Cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers. Low 17.


Chance of showers

Sunday

19 °C

Cloudy with 30 percent chance of showers. High 19.


Chance of showers

Sunday night

13 °C

Cloudy with 40 percent chance of showers. Low 13.


Sunny

Monday

27 °C

Sunny. High 27.


Clear

Monday night

15 °C

Clear. Low 15.


Cloudy

Tuesday

24 °C

Increasing cloudiness. High 24.


Chance of showers

Tuesday night

15 °C

Cloudy periods with 30 percent chance of showers. Low 15.


Chance of showers

Wednesday

22 °C

A mix of sun and cloud with 30 percent chance of showers. High 22.


Yesterday

Low
20.1 °C
High
30.8 °C
Precipitation
0.0 mm

Normals

Low
11.0 °C
High
22.5 °C
Average
16.8 °C

Sunrise and Sunset

Sunrise
5:31 AM
Sunset
9:20 PM

Record Values

Type Year Value
Max 2012 30.7 C
Min 1992 1.1 C
Rainfall 1992 19.3 mm
Snowfall 1954 0.0 cm
Precipitation 1992 19.3 mm
Snow On Ground 1955 0.0 cm

Based on Environment Canada data