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Good morning, Nickel City! Here are stories to start your day

Sudbury outlines $164M emergency services plan revitalization plan

The City of Greater Sudbury is rolling out its $164.6-million emergency services revitalization plan, with a request for proposals opening for architectural services.
The request for proposals encompasses Phase 1 of the project, which includes a budgeted $65.5-million in work at five emergency services stations.
City spokespeople declined comment on the matter, “since this is an active public procurement,” but the tender documents reveal various previously unreported details about the project.

The tender encompasses Phase 1, which includes the construction of two new emergency services:

Station 2 - Minnow Lake ($9.2 million)
Station 20 - Garson ($11.8 million)
... and the extensive renovation of three stations:

Station 16 - Val Therese ($17.3 million)
Station 4 - Long Lake ($10.8 million)
Station 1 - Van Horne ($16.2 million)
In addition to these costs is almost $4 million toward land purchases and project management.
The schedule for these projects calls for detailed design development by June 2025, at which time the tender for general contractors would be sent out. 
The new Minnow Lake and Garson stations are required to be built by the end of 2026, while the renovation of the Val Therese, Long Lake and Van Horne stations are required to be completed by the end of 2028.
There are two new locations proposed for a new Garson station, including south of the Garson Community Centre and Arena on Church Street, and another on the southeast side of the Falconbridge Highway. The existing Garson emergency services station is further north up Church Street. 
Read the full story here:


Laurentian Staff in first contract bargaining since insolvency

Trying to put behind them the feeling of what a union official describes as being “betrayed” during the last set of negotiations in 2020, one of Laurentian University’s unions is currently engaged in collective bargaining with the university.
The contract for the Laurentian University Staff Union (LUSU), which represents 240 front-line, non-faculty employees, expires on June 30.
In the late spring and early summer of 2020, with Laurentian telling the union it was facing financial troubles, LUSU entered negotiations one year early, and offered a number of concessions.
This included a salary cut that allowed the university to save $1.8 million and the union cutting Laurentian a $450,000 cheque to prevent members from having to take furlough days.
However, it was later revealed that Laurentian was already contemplating entering creditor protection under the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (or CCAA) at that point.
Read the full story here:

 

Capreol residents observe first Grow Together Festival

Capreol kicked off its first ever Grow Together Festival Saturday as a way to celebrate the onset of summer and the importance of taking part in sustainable community activities.
Kimberly Harpe, speaking for the Northern Ontario Railroad Museum and Heritage Centre, said the idea was bring together people with similar ideas and goals.  
So today we were hosting the Grow Together Festival. It's a festival centered on permaculture, sustainability, as well as some body and Earth wellness," said Harpe.
"So permaculture is the idea that we can utilize our land and our gardens, working together with communities in the most sustainable way," she added.
Harpe said some of the new ideas to keep the land sustainable may be familiar as older ideas from generations ago.

"So different ways that we can optimize what is being circulated is actually by doing crop rotations. So rotate your crop in order to take care of the land and what it needs.  Sourcing food locally is a great way of reducing the distance in which food needs to travel from farm to table.
Read the full story here:

 

OHCOW celebrates 35 years in Ontario and shows off new office

OHCOW, the Occupational Health Clinics for Ontario Workers, celebrated its 35th anniversary Friday with an open house at the Sudbury office on Westmount Avenue.
And while the group won a significant workers' victory with the recognition of McIntyre Powder being associated with Parkinson’s disease for Northern Ontario miners two years ago, the OHCOW group continues working on a host of other workplace associated illnesses and injuries where workers feel their health and well being has been impacted. The McIntyre Powder campaign continues.
Brittney Ramakko, the executive director of the Northern Region at the Sudbury office said one of the key aims of OHCOW is to help workers establish that their illness or injury was work related. 
The question is how does this set them apart from WSIB, Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board, which is set up to compensate workers who claim their injury or illness came from the workplace?
"So a lot of our clients would have applied for WSIB and had been denied," said Ramakko.
"So they can come to us. We have teams with an occupational health nurse, occupational hygienist, ergonomists and physicians.  They'll review and provide an independent evaluation. So you can come in and get your file looked at and a second opinion, basically," she said.
She said the role of OHCOW is not to refute WSIB but to closely examine any medical or work-related detail that might have been overlooked.
Read the full story here:

 

Drone display will replace fireworks at Science North on Canada Day

While people have traditionally gathered at Science North on Canada Day for a fireworks display, things are going to be different this year.
Science North has opted to instead go with a “cutting-edge” drone show put on by North Star Drone Shows. The show will take place over the Science North grounds at around 10 p.m. July 1, after sunset.
“A drone show is essentially an innovative form of entertainment that uses a fleet of drones, and they are equipped with LED lights to create a dynamic display in the sky,” said Kate Gauvreau, senior manager of on-site business and services development at Science North. 
“So essentially, you'll see all different types of images, some moving images.”
The drones can even create Sudbury-related imagery — Gauvreau confirms there will be an image of the Big Nickel, but doesn’t want to give too much away. The show will be “really about our community and celebrating us.”
So why a drone show instead of fireworks?
Fireworks create waste that has to go to a landfill and create air pollution, and they also produce noise that is disruptive to animals and some people with sensory issues. None of these are concerns with a drone show, said organizers.
Read the full story here:

 

Strike by unionized workers at Sudbury's SNOLAB has ended

SNOLAB reported Friday that 52 unionized employees have voted to accept a new agreement and have ended the strike action that began on May 8, 2024. The striking employees were members of United Steelworkers Union (USW) Local 2020. 
This is excellent news for SNOLAB, for Sudbury, and for Canada’s innovation sector, said SNOLAB Executive Director Jodi Cooley, in a news release.
“SNOLAB strives to provide a world-leading environment for exploring priority questions about the origins and nature of the universe, and that includes providing an attractive work environment offering competitive wages and excellent benefits,” said Cooley.
The new agreement will provide cost of living salary increases and will extend new family leave benefits to unionized workers, said SNOLAB.
Members of USW Local 2020 began their strike a month ago, following repeated attempts to negotiate for fair wages and greater respect from SNOLAB management, said a USW news release on May 8. 
Read the full story here:

Current Weather

Mostly Cloudy

Mostly Cloudy

18.7°C

Pressure
101.5 rising
Visibility
32.2 km
Dewpoint
8.1 °C
Humidity
50%
Wind
NNW 23 km/h

Radar Satellite


Hourly Forecast

Today
2 PM
19°C
Sunny
Today
3 PM
19°C
Sunny
Today
4 PM
20°C
Sunny
Today
5 PM
20°C
Sunny
Today
6 PM
18°C
Sunny
Today
7 PM
15°C
Sunny
Today
8 PM
13°C
Sunny
Today
9 PM
12°C
Clear
Today
10 PM
11°C
Clear
Today
11 PM
10°C
Clear
Tomorrow
12 AM
10°C
Clear
Tomorrow
1 AM
9°C
Clear

7 Day Forecast

Clearing

Today

20 °C

Clearing this afternoon. Wind northwest 20 km/h. High 20. UV index 6 or high.


Clear

Tonight

7 °C

Clear. Wind north 20 km/h becoming light late this evening. Low 7.


Sunny

Saturday

21 °C

Sunny. High 21. UV index 7 or high.


Cloudy periods

Saturday night

11 °C

Increasing cloudiness. Low 11.


Cloudy

Sunday

21 °C

Cloudy. High 21.


Chance of showers

Sunday night

16 °C

Cloudy with 60 percent chance of showers. Low 16.


Sunny

Monday

30 °C

Sunny. High 30.


Cloudy periods

Monday night

19 °C

Cloudy periods. Low 19.


Sunny

Tuesday

31 °C

Sunny. High 31.


Clear

Tuesday night

20 °C

Clear. Low 20.


Chance of showers

Wednesday

30 °C

A mix of sun and cloud with 30 percent chance of showers. High 30.


Chance of showers

Wednesday night

19 °C

Cloudy periods with 40 percent chance of showers. Low 19.


Chance of showers

Thursday

30 °C

A mix of sun and cloud with 30 percent chance of showers. High 30.


Yesterday

Low
0 °C
High
0 °C
Precipitation
2.2 mm

Normals

Low
10.2 °C
High
21.8 °C
Average
16.0 °C

Sunrise and Sunset

Sunrise
5:30 AM
Sunset
9:18 PM

Record Values

Type Year Value
Max 1988 32.4 C
Min 1978 0.5 C
Rainfall 1999 33.1 mm
Snowfall 1954 0.0 cm
Precipitation 1999 33.1 mm
Snow On Ground 1955 0.0 cm

Based on Environment Canada data