Skip to content

Compensation not ensured for all work-related illnesses - Jane Edgett

On April 28, as we mourn for those killed on the job, we must also remember those whose workplace-related deaths were slow and agonizing. Most Canadians do not realize that if they are seriously injured at work, their compensation is not ensured.

On April 28, as we mourn for those killed on the job, we must also remember those whose workplace-related deaths were slow and agonizing. Most Canadians do not realize that if they are seriously injured at work, their compensation is not ensured.

Many seriously injured employees are simply refused compensation and their subsequent physical, financial and emotional suffering can be overwhelming.

When the workers compensation system refuses to pay for long term injuries, they do more harm to the employee and their family by thrusting them into a cycle of poverty and despair that can lead to death.

Some injured employees have even committed suicide.

But the long-term suffering of injured workers is no longer the primary concern of the workers compensation system, which has strayed from its original purpose over the last century. It has increasingly downloaded its responsibilities onto the worker's family and other social programs.

The Canadian Injured Workers Society is questioning the functionality of the workers' compensation system as it exists today in Canada.

As we mourn workplace deaths, the CIWS is calling for a federal judicial inquiry into wrongdoing by workers compensation boards across Canada.

Visit www.ciws.ca or www.wcbcanada.com   for more information.

Jane Edgett
President
Canadian Injured Workers Society



Comments