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Charges laid in Buddy's death

A 32-year-old man has been charged with four counts of animal cruelty, under the Ontario SPCA Act, in connection to the death of Buddy.
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A 32-year-old man has been charged with four counts of animal cruelty, under the Ontario SPCA Act, in connection to the death of Buddy. Supplied photo.

A 32-year-old man has been charged with four counts of animal cruelty, under the Ontario SPCA Act, in connection to the death of Buddy.

The four charges include one count for causing the animal to be in distress, one count for permitting the animal to be in distress, one count for failing to provide adequate and appropriate medical attention, and one count for failing to humanely kill an animal by a method that is humane and minimizes the pain and distress to the animal.

The Sudbury SPCA and the Noelville/Warren Ontario Provincial Police interviewed persons responsible in the shooting of Buddy at the Warren OPP Detachment, according to a news release.

The OPP responded to a complaint on March 6 at about 5 p.m. of a German shepherd dog being shot on Montee Brazeau Road in St. Charles. The dog sustained serious injuries to his face and was transported to the Walden Animal Hospital, where he received veterinary care.

The Ontario SPCA was contacted on March 7 to participate in the investigation.

The dog eventually succumbed to his injuries on March 9.

A person charged under the Ontario SPCA Act could face a maximum fine of $60,000, up to two years in jail and a lifetime ban of owning any animals.

According to police, information was received that there have been threats and malicious comments being said and written on Facebook and other Internet sites. Police are reminding the public that any threats made are considered a criminal offence and will be dealt with accordingly.

The Ontario SPCA is reminding pet owners that should you have any questions or concerns for the care of your animal, there are options available to address the situation. They are encouraged to contact their local veterinarian or the Ontario SPCA and those options can be discussed with them.

Posted by Arron Pickard