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Local students head to national science fair

Four students from the Rainbow District School Board will participate in the Canada-Wide Science Fair in Toronto from May 14-21. The science fair is open to students in Grade 7 to 12.
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Four students from the Rainbow District School Board will participate in the Canada-Wide Science Fair in Toronto from May 14-21.

The science fair is open to students in Grade 7 to 12. The competitors were chosen from roughly 25,000 students at 100 regional science and technology fairs from across the country.

“We congratulate all winners of the Sudbury Regional Science Fair,” Rainbow District School board chair Tyler Campbell said, in a press release. “We wish our Canada-Wide Science Fair participants all the best at the national level.”

The following Rainbow students will represent Sudbury at the 2011 Canada-Wide Science Fair - Sarah MacLean, Grade 8, Algonquin Road Public School; John Dawson, Grade 8, R.L. Beattie Public School; Alana Sorgini, Grade 8, Algonquin Road Public School; and Radhika Nangia, Grade 7, MacLeod Public School.

Canada-Wide Science Fair participants:

Sarah MacLean
Grade 8
Algonquin Road Public School
Nanobots in a Virtual World

Sarah MacLean programmed virtual nanobots to move around a virtual oil storage container and eat sludge, convert it to energy, and drop the energy off at a collection point. She conducted many experiments and simulations and concluded that there were three important variables contributing to the energy output. Using her findings, she created the most effective and environmentally friendly program.
MacLean placed first in the Junior Division Computer Sciences category at the Sudbury Regional Science Fair. She also received the Laurentian University Dean of Science Award; the Laurentian University Computer or Mathematics Award for a project that best deals with mathematics or computer science, a related topic or process, or in some way contributes to the field of mathematics and computer science; the Laurentian University Engineering Science Award for the project that best deals with engineering, a related topic or process, or in some way contributes to the field of engineering; the Laurentian University Scholarship Award for the best junior project in the fair and the best intermediate project in the fair with a $1,000 scholarship to Laurentian University; the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation Stepping Stone Award; and the Mirarco Special Award for best in the fair.

John Dawson
Grade 8
R.L. Beattie Public School
Enhanced Solar Energy

John Dawson used mirrors to recapture reflected light from solar panels to maximize available rays of sunlight.
Dawson captured first place in Junior Division Engineering. He was the recipient of the Laurentian University Dean of Science Award. He also won the Youth Sciences Ontario Provincial Energy Ambassador Award for outstanding scientific quality with primary focus on distribution, supply management, and use of conservation of electrical energy; the Ontario Ministry of the Environment Environmental Innovator Award for demonstrating a creative approach to an environmental problem that could lead to cleaner air, land, or water; and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology Innovation Award for best project demonstrating the most innovative development, adaptation, or use of technology in any subject area.

Alana Sorgini
Grade 8
Algonquin Road Public School
Transportation for the Nation

Sorgini conducted a study on the common forms of transportation and their impact on the environment as well as their economy.
The student won first place in the Junior Division Physical Sciences category. She also received an Environmental Award for a project that deals with some aspect of land reclamation or improving water quality or other environmental issues.

Radhika Nangia
Grade 7
MacLeod Public School
Human Observation

The project was developed to find out if there is an age and gender difference in human observation. Three tests were created in which Radhika tested 36 participants between the age of 9 and 14. Each participant had to identify shapes and colours, identify images and determine differences. From this project, Nangia concluded that age and gender do not affect human observation.
Nangia placed first in the Junior Division Life Sciences category. She also captured the Child Health Award for best project that deals with children's health or that could have an impact on children's health.



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