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LU architecture school receives green light

The province's Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities has given the Laurentian School of Architecture the “green light,” putting forth $21 million for its construction in the city's downtown and pledging to fund its ongoing operating costs.
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The province has announced it will invest $21 million in the Laurentian University School of Architecture. From left are Blaine Nicholls, architect and chair of project steering committee, Dominic Giroux, president Laurentian University and Mathew Dipsell, grade 11 Lockerby Composite student who plans to attend the school when it opens. Photo by Marg Seregelyi.

The province's Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities has given the Laurentian School of Architecture the “green light,” putting forth $21 million for its construction in the city's downtown and pledging to fund its ongoing operating costs.

The project has a total cost of about $44 million. The City of Greater Sudbury has already promised $1 million per year over 10 years for the project.

Laurentian president Dominic Giroux told Northern Life after the funding announcement at Tom Davies Square May 24 that the university has also asked FedNor and the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation for $5 million each for the project.

The location of the school has not yet been announced, as it is still being finalized.

Giroux said the first architecture students could start their studies in September 2012, although it's more likely they will start in September 2013. He said the university's board of governors will make this decision next month.

Once the school is fully up and running, likely in September 2018, it will have 400 students. Students will first earn a four-year undergraduate degree in architecture, and then go on to study for their master's degree for two years.

“The school will assist in meeting the demand for highly skilled professionals in the coming decades,” Giroux said, in a press release.

“In turn the students will develop the expertise to help solve local and global design and urban issues.”

Sudbury MPP Rick Bartolucci, who made the announcement on behalf of the province, said the architecture school is a “great investment” in Sudbury's downtown and in the city's youth.

“I met a young man today who told me of his dream to become an architect. Knowing that he will soon be able to pursue this goal within his community is thrilling. I am proud that the McGuinty government is continuing to invest in the north and excited to see the impact of these investments for years to come.”

 

For more on this story, check future editions of Northern Life.

 

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Heidi Ulrichsen

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