Skip to content

Project SEARCH HSN combines class work with hands-on training

Thanks to a partnership between Rainbow District School Board, Health Sciences North, the City of Greater Sudbury and March of Dimes Canada, students in their final year of high school can develop skills required for entry-level employment

An international program that helps students who require additional support prepare for the world of work has arrived in Greater Sudbury thanks to a partnership between Rainbow District School Board, Health Sciences North, the City of Greater Sudbury and March of Dimes Canada.

Project SEARCH HSN is a transition-to-work program that combines classroom instruction with hands-on training. Students in their final year of high school develop skills required for entry-level employment.

In its first year locally, ten students from Rainbow Schools will engage in three internships in various departments at Health Sciences North. The placements, which are eight to ten weeks in duration, are determined by student interest and skill level. Internships are guided by skilled, experienced staff including a teacher from Rainbow District School Board and two job trainers from March of Dimes Canada.

“Everyone at HSN and HSNRI takes great pride in our organization being a place of learning. Project SEARCH is an initiative that challenges outdated barriers and aims to help create a more inclusive society and we are proud to be part of this partnership,” said Dominic Giroux, President and CEO of Health Sciences North.

“In September, we will be welcoming our first Project SEARCH cohort - with ten interns who are living with disabilities joining our teams in Pharmacy, Building Services, Food Services, and Laboratory, and other areas. Their support will contribute greatly to our hospital and it will be a privilege to help them develop the skills and confidence they need to thrive and build their futures.”

Maija Neva of Lo-Ellen Park Secondary School says she looks forward to her internships: “I can’t wait. I will work anywhere they tell me.” 

Seth Dumais-Armitage of Lasalle Secondary School was equally as excited to learn new skills: “After I am finished, I would like to work in a kitchen or maybe in a restaurant,” he said.

Certificates of Internship were presented to the first group of participants during the program launch at Health Sciences North on Aug. 30. 

Project SEARCH was launched in 1996 at the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center in an effort to promote a vibrant, inclusive workforce. There are now more than 600 Project SEARCH sites worldwide.