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Teenager did the right thing - Audrey Dugas

You may recall a story in Northern Life about a year and a half ago about my 12-year-old who had delivered papers for over a year, saved his money to buy a $500 mountain bike, and had it stolen from our garage only a few months later.
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You may recall a story in Northern Life about a year and a half ago about my 12-year-old who had delivered papers for over a year, saved his money to buy a $500 mountain bike, and had it stolen from our garage only a few months later. He was devastated to say the least.

I felt compelled to write you again with respect to an incident that happened this past weekend, only one week after having his Samsung MP3 player and Sony headphones stolen from his locker at school.

My son (now 13) went to the Royal Bank on Lasalle to deposit a small amount of money into his account to start saving up to replace the MP3 player.

Upon approaching the bank machine inside the building, he found another client's card still in the machine and all the bank information up on the screen for anyone to see.

Apparently this person was in a hurry or had other things on his mind when he left the bank, and inadvertently forgot to complete his transaction and/or
take his card with him.

After a few minutes of waiting for my son to return to our vehicle, he returned with a gold-coloured client card in hand. He got in and told me how he went to the bank machine, saw all the information on the screen and knew the last person had left without finishing his transaction and even left the card in the machine.

He said, "I could have taken out enough money to buy myself another MP3 player and nobody would ever known it was me, but something inside me
said it was the wrong thing to do."

Here was an opportunity staring him right in the face, but knowing what it feels like to have anything stolen, he knew the right thing to do was to cancel the transaction, pull out the person's card, and (after talking to me about it) drop the card in the mail slot inside the bank, so it could be returned to the rightful owner. He did me proud.

Later during the day, he was still questioning why he did what he did knowing there's people out there who would have "taken the money and ran."

I reminded him of what a good, honest kid he was, that he has values and morals, and that he had done the right thing even though someone else may have done otherwise. I'm not writing this letter looking for sympathy from any of your readers, but only to reiterate that there are still some good, honest kids out there.

And I feel comforted in knowing that I must be doing something right as a parent.

We attempted to find and call the owner to let him know what had happened, and that his money and bank card were safe, but didn't have any luck.

Audrey Dugas
Sudbury




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