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People with disabilities part of the Conservative platform

Various efforts strive to break down barriers for those living with disabilities so they can live full lives and participate in society
O'Toole
Federal Conservative candidate Erin O'Toole (Matt Vis/tbnewswatch.com)
Edmonton, AB - Today, the Hon. Erin O’Toole, Leader of Canada’s Conservatives, released his plan to break down barriers for Canadians living with disabilities.

One in five Canadians lives with a disability. People living with long-term conditions or disabilities were also among the most impacted groups during the pandemic, with more than one-third experiencing a temporary or permanent job loss or reduced hours.

“As Prime Minister, I will work to build a Canada where people of every ability can live full lives and participate fully in society, including in the workforce,” said O’Toole. “Canada’s Recovery Plan will provide Canadians with living with disabilities the supports they need, while always leaving them further ahead when they choose to pursue work.” 

Canada’s Recovery Plan will support Canadians with disabilities by: 

  • Doubling the Disability Supplement in the Canada Workers Benefit from $713 to $1,500, providing a major boost to lower-income Canadians with disabilities on top of our increase in the Canada Workers Benefit. 
  • Overhauling the complex array of disability supports and benefits to ensure that working always leaves someone further ahead and work with the provinces to ensure federal programs are designed to work with provincial programs to achieve this result.
  • Providing an additional $80 million per year through the Enabling Accessibility Fund to ensure:
  • Adding more incentives for small business and community projects to improve accessibility.
  • Grants and support for all types of accessibility equipment that Canadians with disabilities need to work.
  • Enhancements to existing programs that will get more Canadians with disabilities into the workforce.
  • Reducing the number of hours required to qualify for the Disability Tax Credit and the Registered Disability Savings Plan from 14 to 10 hours per week.

“The disability community has been advocating for these improvements for years, but their demands have too often been met with lip service rather than action,” said O’Toole. “Conservatives are prepared to put our money where our mouth is, providing real, immediate funding increases to support Canadians living with disabilities through this difficult time.”

If you don’t care about securing better disability supports for Canadians, you have three parties to choose from in this election. If you do, then there is only one choice, O’Toole said.