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Man facing sentencing can no longer practice medicine

BY KEITH LACEY klacey@northernlife.ca One week before he’s to be sentenced in criminal court, a Sudbury doctor has had his license to practice medicine revoked. Dr.

BY KEITH LACEY
klacey@northernlife.ca


One week before he’s to be sentenced in criminal court, a Sudbury doctor has had his license to practice medicine revoked.

Dr. Richard Nanka-Bruce, 62, had his medical certificate to practice medicine revoked Wednesday by the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario (CPSO).  This is the harshest penalty imposed by the college, said Kathryn Clarke, CPSO senior communications co-ordinator.

In January, Nanka-Bruce was  found guilty by Justice Ian Gordon of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in Sudbury of two counts of sexual assault and two counts of indecent assault.
Assistant Crown attorney Diana Fuller told the court in January she will be seeking a lengthy jail sentence against Nanka-Bruce when he’s sentenced on those four convictions March 29.

Nanka-Bruce did not attend Wednesday’s hearing before the college’s discipline committee, but was represented by Ottawa lawyer William Vanveen.

The college’s prosecutor read in an agreed statement of facts and admissions, which was not opposed by Vanveen, said Clarke.

In the statement, Nanka-Bruce admitted being found guilty and having criminal convictions registered in criminal court constituted professional misconduct, said Clarke.

The discipline committee accepted a joint proposal that Nanka-Bruce have his licence to practise medicine revoked.  He will not be able to apply for reinstatement with the college for a minimum of five years, the harshest penalty imposed by the college, said Clarke.

“The law in this province provides that doctors who have had their licence revoked can apply for reinstatement,” she said. “In this case, the timetable for any application for reinstatement was set at five years, which is the maximum penalty the college can impose.”

Nanka-Bruce’s admission of professional misconduct resulted in charges of sexual impropriety brought against him by the college being withdrawn and saved several witnesses from having to testify before the discipline committee, said Clarke.

Nanka-Bruce was found guilty of sexually stimulating female patients while conducting internal examinations. Much of the sexual impropriety took place in the late 1970s and early 1980s.

Nanka-Bruce has remained free since being found guilty in criminal court. Next Wednesday’s sentencing hearing before Gordon is expected to last a full day.